In the first part of this series I covered installing several PHP tools for continuous integration testing (PHPUnit, Mess Detecter, Copy Paste Detecter, Code Sniffer, Code Coverage, Documenter 2, Lines of Code, and Simple Test) and installing Jenkins.  You can find the first part here  In this part I will cover installing the needed plugins to use the installed PHP tools and to authenticate to active directory, and to use HTTPS (SSL) instead of the standard HTTP connection.

If the Jenkins server is currently running (if you just finished up part 1, it probably is) stop the server by running the following command

$/etc/init.d/jenkins stop

Setup the LDAP / AD Certificate

If you care planning to connect to an LDAP server or Active Directory and use LDAPS when doing so, you will need to let Jenkins know about the certificate the server has. To do so following the following steps:

Download the InstallCert tool from here

Install the unzip application

$apt-get install unzip

Unzip the tool

$unzip InstallCert.zip

Move the tool the the Java bin location

$mv InstallCert* $JAVA_HOME/jre/bin

Get the servers certificate. If you have multiple servers to get certs from, repeat this step for each.

$java InstallCert someServer.example.com:636

If you are prompted for anything, just press enter to continue on.

The certificate(s) will be placed in a file called jssecerts. Now we need to import this file into the cacerts file that java uses.

$keytool --importkeystore -srckeystore jssecacerts -destkeystore $JAVA_HOME/jre/lib/security/cacerts -noprompt

The password for the keystore is “changeit”.

To inform Jenkins of the cacerts file, edit the file /etc/defaults/jenkins and add the line to the file before the end (preferable under the commented out JAVA_ARGS line)

JAVA_ARGS="-Djavax.net.ssl.trustStore=/etc/ssl/certs/java/cacerts"

Setting Up SSL (HTTPS)

Edit the file /etc/defaults/jenkins and add the following lines

HTTPS_PORT=8443

HTTPS_KEYSTORE=/etc/ssl/certs/java/YourCertFile.crt
HTTPS_KEYSTORE_KEY=/etc/ssl/certs/java/YourCertKeyFile.key

Also set HTTP_PORT line to -1 to disable it

HTTP_PORT = -1

At the bottom of the file, set the JENKINS_ARGS line to the following

JENKINS_ARGS="--webroot=/var/cache/jenkins/war --httpPort=$HTTP_PORT --ajp13Port=$AJP_PORT --httpsPort=$HTTPS_PORT --httpsCertificate=$HTTPS_KEYSTORE --httpsPrivateKey=$HTTPS_KEYSTORE_KEY"

Installing the Plugins

  1. Open a web browser and go to https://yourServer. example.com:8443
  2. Click on Manage Jenkins
  3. Click on Manage Plugins
  4. Select the “Available” tab
  5. Select the following plugins
    • Active Directory Plugin
    • checkstyle
    • clover php plugin
    • dry
    • html publisher plugin
    • jdepend plugin
    • plot plugin
    • pmd plugin
    • violations
    • xUnit plugin
  6. Click “Install without Restart”

Setup Authentication to Active Directory

  1. Go to Manage Jenkins -> Configure Global Security
  2. Check “Enable Security”
  3. Select “Active Directory” under the Security Realm section
  4. Click “Advanced”
  5. Set the following fields:Domain Name: example.com
    Bind DN: CN=someUser,OU=Users,DC=example,DC=com
    Bind Password: TheBindUsersPassword
  6. Click “Test”
  7. If all is good, click “Apply”, else trouble shoot the issue
  8. Click “Save”
  9. Try to authenticate as a known user by clicking “log in” in the upper right corder and authenticating

NOTE: This setup did not work when I entered a domain controller. If I left the field blank, Jenkins was able to find the appropriate server and authenticate without issue.

Setting up LDAP Authentication

If you don’t want to use the active directory plugin, you can also authenticate using LDAP functionality Jenkins already has.

  1. Go to Manage Jenkins -> Configure Global Security
  2. Check “Enable Security”
  3. Under the Security Realm section, select “LDAP”
  4. Set the following fields:Server: ldaps://someServer.example.com:636
    User Search Filter: sAMAccountName={0}
    Manager DN:CN=someUser,OU=Users,DN=example,DN=com
    Manager Password:The manager users password
  5. Click “Apply”
  6. Click “Save”
  7. Test authenticating as a known user by clicking the “log in” link in the upper right corner and trying to log in

NOTE: If you intend to authenticate to an LDAP server like eDir (Novell) do not set the User Search Field to sAMAccountName={0} as it will not work

A Little Extra Security

To help prevent Cross-Site Scripting do the following:

  1. Go to Manage Jenkins -> Configure Global Security
  2. Check “Prevent Cross Site Request Forgery Exploits”
  3. Select “Default Crumb Issuer”
  4. Click “Apply”
  5. Click “Save”

Configuring Access

Now that you have users authenticating to Jenkins, you should limit what they can do. By default, Jenkins allows all users to do all things.

  1. Go to Manage Jenkins -> Configure Global SecurityUnder the “Authorization” section select “Project-based Matrix Authorization Strategy”
  2. Enter your username in the “User/group to add” field and click the “Add” button
  3. You should probably give yourself full permissions, you can do this quickly by clicking the image next to the red X on the right side of the row for your user
  4. If you want to add a group, just enter the group name in the “User/group to add” filed and click add. You used to have to prefix groups with ROLE_, but this is no longer required
  5. Set the permissions for the group or users you add to the list

NOTE: Under this authorization scheme, the permissions given to the users or groups here should be their base permissions site wide. In other words, give them the minimum amount here. Then in the projects they are a working on, you can specify additional rights under the “job configuration screen” for the project.

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